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You must read this carefully:

Many departments have special topic numbers. These are denoted by an asterisk in our course lists. All special topics classes require approval from Director of Undergraduate Studies Dr. Jonathan Weiler to receive GLBL credit. Do not assume you will receive GLBL credit for taking a special topics class if you have not petitioned Dr. Jonathan Weiler in advance.

Don’t forget, you can petition to have a class count for major credit. For courses taken as part of a study abroad program, please see the Study Abroad page.

Course offerings are subject to change. To confirm whether a course is being offered, check the online Directory of Classes in Connect Carolina. For course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Bulletin.

Course list last updated October 16, 2013.

FYS = first-year seminar; * = departmental approval for credit still necessary

Core Courses

GLBL 210 Global Issues
DRAM 117 Perspectives in World Drama
ENGL 141 World Literatures
ENST 201 Environment and Society
GEOG 120 World Regional Geography
GEOG 121 People and Places
GEOG 130 Developing World
HIST 140 The World since 1945
JOMC 446 International Communication and Comparative Journalism
MUSC 146 Introduction to Latino American Music
PHIL/POLI/PWAD 272 Ethics of Peace, War, and Defense
RELI 181 Later Islamic Civilization and Modern Muslim Cultures
POLI 130 Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLI 150 International Relations and World Politics
SOCI 111 Human Societies
SOCI 121 Population Problems
SOCI 133 Sociology of Politics

 

Theme Courses

International Politics, Nation-States, Social Movements

AAAD 101 Introduction to Africa
ANTH 280 Anthropology of War and Peace
ANTH 319 Global Health
COMM 390* Special Topics
ENGL 365 Migration and Globalization
ENST 370 Agriculture and the Environment
GEOG 435 Environmental Politics
GEOG 453 Political Geography
GEOG 460 Geographies of Economic Change
GLBL 390* Special Topics in Global Studies
HIST 577 United States Foreign Relations in the 20th Century
HNRS 352* Seminar in Social and Behavioral Sciences
JOMC 446 International Communication and Comparative Journalism
MUSC 390H* Honors Seminar in Music
POLI 130 Introduction to Comparative Politics
POLI 238 Contemporary Latin American Politics
POLI 239
Introduction to European Government
POLI 433 Politics of the European Union
POLI 438 Democracy and International Institutions in an Undivided Europe
POLI 442 International Political Economy
POLI 443 American Foreign Policy
POLI 444 Seminar on Terrorism
POLI 457 International Conflict Processes
POLI 471 Recent Contemporary Political Though
PWAD 252 International Organizations and Global Issues
PWAD 350 National and International Security
RELI 181 Later Islamic Civilization and Modern Muslim Cultures
RUES 469 Conflict and Intervention in the Former Yugoslavia
SOCI 111 Human Societies
SOCI 121 Population Problems
SOCI 133 Sociology of Politics
WMST 388 The International Politics of Sexual and Reproductive Health

GLOBAL ECONOMICS, TRADE, AND DEVELOPMENT

AAAD 212 Africa in the Global System
ANTH 320 Anthropology of Development
ECON 434 History of Economic Doctrines
ECON 450 Health Economics: Problems and Policy
ECON 460 International Economics
ECON 461 European Economic Integration
ECON 465 Economic Development
ECON 469 Western and Asian Economic Systems
ECON 560 Advanced International Economics
ENST 490* Special Topics in Environmental Science and Studies
GEOG 453 Political Geography
GEOG 458 Urban Latin America: Politics, Economy, and Society
GEOG 460 Geographies of Economic Change
GLBL 390* Special Topics in Global Studies

 

GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT

Note: Global Health and Environment theme courses may count toward the Global Economics theme for students who declared the major prior to Fall 2008

ANTH 147 Comparative Healing Systems
ANTH 151 Anthropological Perspectives on Food and Culture
ANTH 318 Human Growth and Development
ANTH 319 Global Health
ANTH 470 Medicine and Anthropology
ENST 370 Agriculture and the Environment
ENST 490* Special Topics in Environmental Science and Studies
ENVR 600 Health and Environment
GEOG 434 Cultural Ecology of Disease, Agriculture, and Urbanization
GEOG 435 Environmental Politics
HNRS 352* Seminar in Social and Behavioral Sciences
PLCY 565 Global Health Policy
WMST 388 The International Politics of Sexual and Reproductive Health

TRANSNATIONAL CULTURES, IDENTITIES, ARTS

ANTH 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 147 Comparative Healing Systems
ANTH 280 Anthropology of War and Peace
ANTH 320 Anthropology of Development
ANTH 435 Consciousness and Symbols
COMM 574 War and Culture
ENGL 364 Introduction to Latina/o Studies
FREN 375 Francophone Studies
GLBL 390* Special Topics in Global Studies
JOMC 446 International Communication and Comparative Journalism
MUSC 147 Introduction to Latino American Musics
RELI 121 Introduction to Religion and Culture
RELI 285 The Buddhist Tradition: Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka
RELI 428 Religion and Anthropology
SPAN 344 Contemporary Latin America: Mexico, Central America and the Andean Region
SPAN 345 Contemporary Latin America: Caribbean and the Southern Cone
WMST 124 Sex and Gender in Society
WMST 290* ST: Women, Empire, and the Law in Africa and the Middle East or Women & Islam in Africa

 

Area Courses

AFRICA

AAAD 101 Introduction to Africa
AAAD 201 The Literature of Africa
AAAD 212 Africa in the Global System
GLBL 390* Special Topics
HIST 130 Africa in the 21st Century
GLBL 390* Special Topics in Global Studies
WMST 237 African Gender History
WMST 290* Special Topics in Women’s Studies

ASIA

ASIA 285 The Buddhist Tradition: Southeast Asia And Sri Lanka
ASIA 490* Topics in Asian Studies
CHIN 252 Introduction to Chinese Culture through Narrative
CHIN 354 Chinese Culture through Calligraphy
CHIN 463 Narrative Ethics in Modern China
GLBL 390* Special Topics in Global Studies
HIST 136 History South Asian History since 1750
HIST 288 Japan in the 20th Century at University
JAPN 161 Geisha in History
JAPN 162 Japanese Popular Culture
JAPN 375 The Culture of Modern, Imperial Japan, 1900-1945
KOR 151 Education and Social Changes in Contemporary Korea
RELI 183 Asian Religions
RELI 285 The Buddhist Tradition: Southeast Asia and Sri Lanka

LATIN AMERICA

GEOG 458 Urban Latin America
HIST 143 Latin America since Independence
HIST 528 FYS: Ideology and Revolution in Latin American History
GLBL 390* Special Topics in Global Studies
JOMC 447 International Media Studies
LTAM 101 Introduction to Latin American Studies
MUSC 147 Introduction to Latin(o) American Music
POLI 238 Contemporary Latin American Politics
POLI 434 Politics of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean
PORT 275 Portuguese and Brazilian Fiction
SPAN 330 Cultural History of the Hispanic World
SPAN 344 Contemporary Latin America: Mexico, Central America, and the Andean Region
SPAN 345 Contemporary Latin America: The Caribbean and the Southern Cone
WMST 290* Special Topics in Women’s Studies
WMST 388 The International Politics of Sexual and Reproductive Health

MIDDLE EAST

ASIA 490* Topics in Asian Studies
HIST 490* Special Topics
RELI 64 FYS: Reintroducing Islam
RELI 181 Later Islamic Civilization and Modern Muslim Cultures
RELI 480 Modern Muslim Literatures
RELI/ASIA 581 Sufism

 

WESTERN EUROPE AND THE EUROPEAN UNION

ECON 461 European Economic Integration
GERM 255 Germany and the Cold War: From Allied Occupation to Division and Reunification (1945–1990)
GERM 257 Society and Culture in Postwar Germany
GERM 302 German Language and Culture
HIST 259 Women And Gender In Europe Since 1750
HIST 262 History of the Holocaust: the Destruction of the European Jews
HRNS 353* Seminar in Historical Analysis
ITAL 333 Italian Film and Culture
ITAL 398 Undergraduate Seminar in Italian
POLI 239 Introduction to European Government
POLI 433 Politics of the European Union
SPAN 340 Cultures of Contemporary Spain 

RUSSIA AND EASTERN EUROPE

HIST 162 Russia Since 1861
POLI/RUES/PWAD/SOCI 260 Crisis and Change in Russia and Eastern Europe
RUSS 273 Russian Culture and Society: 1890-1917
RUSS 442 Russian Literature and Culture: From Cold War to Capitalism

 

GLBL COURSES

GLBL 193: Global Studies Internship

Professor Michal Osterweil

GLBL 196: Independent Study in Global Studies

Section 001: Professor Andrew Reynolds

Section 002: Professor Jonathan Weiler

Section 003: Professor Michal Osterweil

Section 004: Professor Erica Johnson

GLBL 210 section 001: Global Issues

Professor Michal Osterweil

GLBL 210 section 002: Global Issues

Professor Jonathan Weiler

GLBL 281: Phillips Ambassadors Program

Professor Michael Tsin

GLBL 381: Great Decisions

Professor Jonathan Weiler

GLBL 382: Latin American Migrant Perspectives

Professor Hannah Gill

GLBL 390: Current Topics

Section 001: Professor Mark Driscoll

This class will serve as both an advanced introduction to liberalism and neoliberalism as well as an in-depth historical examination of three of the most important moments in their respective conditions of possibility. The first will be the two Opium Wars waged by the Euro-American powers against China from 1839 until 1860. The second will be the movement towards financialization and away from commodity and fixed capital in the United States and Western Europe in the mid-1970s. The third will be the market reforms that the Chinese Communist leadership introduced in the early 1980s, a significant event in economic history. The class will feature a diverse set of texts such as Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations, Milton Friedman’s Capitalism and Freedom, Naomi Klein’s Shock Doctrine, and novels by the postcolonial writer Amitav Ghosh and the Chinese writer Yu Hua.

Section 002: Professor Michal Osterweil

This course seeks to explore paradigms of development and social justice. It asks how experiences of global, as well as domestic development and service connect to social change projects and paradigms. By deliberately juxtaposing questions of global development with an investigation of approaches in community organizing —both through course material and service learning assignments—, the course encourages students to develop a more critical understanding of the relationship between development projects and social change or emancipatory frameworks. The course will briefly go through the history of development paradigms, from modernization theory to alternative development approaches, emphasizing the changing understandings and theories that went behind them.  It then asks how notions of development relate to paradigms of community development, including community organizing and resistance paradigms. What is the difference between an organization working from a community organizing perspective, and one that speaks about community development? What can we learn from historical and contemporary examples, both in the US and elsewhere? This course combines service-learning, with a community-research component, offering students the ability to not only reflect on their own experiences working with and serving a community organization, but also encouraging research into, and potentially dialogue about, the very models those organizations are using, as well as diverse volunteer/service models that have been employed in domestic and international development projects. As such the students will be intentionally placed with organizations with diverse models/mission statements, as long as they fit within a community organizing/community development or community empowerment rubric.

*Email osterwei@email.unc.edu for questions or to get permission to enroll. (This course fulfills EE requirement).

Section 003: Professor Aseem Hasnain

This interdisciplinary course uses findings from recent field research to engage with theories of collective identity. Comparative-historical sociology as well as ethnographic and visual methods form the core of this course. Field research about the Shia-Muslim community in modern India, combines with discussion of select cases from USA, Europe, and the Middle East for a global classroom experience.

Section 004: Professor Michael Tsin

Colonization, Migration, and National Identity

It is fashionable to speak of a “globalized” world these days, but how did this world come into being and what does the term exactly mean?  More specifically, while the global movement of commodities, information and services seems mostly rather unrestrained these days, why is the movement of people often subjected to rigorous controls and restrictions?  Indeed, why does one need a “passport” to travel across borders?  What are borders?  How are they established?  What is a “citizen”?  What is a “migrant” or “immigrant”?  What are the differences between “empire” and “nation-state”?  Or “subjects” and “citizens”?  What are “global” institutions?  Why do people seem to cling onto their “national identity” as a primary marker of their own identity in this increasingly globalized world?  What are the obligations, if any, of the developed countries to the developing world and why?  How are these questions related to each other?

The language of globalization and citizenship as well as debates on (im)migration are, of course, familiar to most Americans, although the answers to the questions above are often not as straightforward as they might first appear.  People had always, of course, moved, although they have been moving in greater numbers and over longer distances in the “modern” era.  As always, human migration provides both opportunities and challenges for communities everywhere.  However, the issue of human migration has, more often than not, been presented as a “problem” in search of solutions in our current political and popular discourse.  The objective of this course is, then, to explore the processes through which we came to perceive this age-old human activity as a “problem,” to ask howand why that happened and to understand its impacts on other spheres of our political and social life.  By tracing the variegated histories that inform our contemporary discourses, it is hoped that participants in this class will be able to generate an informed and nuanced discussion of this critical issue in the contemporary world.

GLBL 394: Great Decisions Coordinating Committee

Professor Jonathan Weiler

GLBL 482: Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics

TBD

GLBL 691H: Honors in Global Studies

Professor Erica Johnson

GLBL 789: Teaching LAC

Professor Tanya Kinsella